18
May
08

Coffee Truffles

I recently received a request from a friend:

Hey Jeremy! I have a request because I know that you know alot about chocolate!! I need a recipe of a soft ganache filling that I can flavour with coffee to pipe inside a chocolate mould to make truffles with runny centers do u know what I mean???

The following makes quite a bit of ganache for piping into shells. You can divide the recipe in half, if you don’t need that many.

For the ganache:

700g whipping cream,

1000g milk couverture,

20g glucose,

This is a good starting point for a pipe-able milk chocolate ganache. As for the coffee flavouring, you can either whisk an instant coffee into the cream just before adding the chocolate, or use a shot of espresso if you have access to an espresso maker. You can also go the coffee flavoured liqueur route, and add about 50g before adding the chocolate.

The strength of the coffee flavour is dependant on personal taste, so feel free to experiment. I’ve also made cappuccino truffles by using white couverture, and increasing the amount by 100g. To use the above recipe for a dark truffle, the cream and dark couverture should be 900g each.

you can change the flavours all you want, but try not to toy too much with the composition. There is a delicate process involved in the recipe formulation that keeps the ganache from separating. Keep in mind that oil and water don’t mix.

Bring your liquids to a boil, then carefully dump in the chocolate. Don’t whisk it at this point! use a rubber spatula to make sure the ganache is blended together, but try to avoid mixing air into it. From here on out, air is the enemy.

Set the ganache aside to cool, and cover with plastic wrap. Make sure there is no air between the wrap and the ganache, you don’t want bubbles. The reason you don’t want air is that air pockets inside the truffle allow space for mold to grow. Being diligent in keeping air out will give your truffles a longer shelf life (they should be good for about 2 weeks).

Once the ganache has cooled to room temperature, it is ready to be piped. Keep it covered if it’s not going to be used right away. Once piped into shells, allow ganache to set, then cap them with tempered chocolate, roll them, and decorate as desired. 


4 Responses to “Coffee Truffles”


  1. May 19, 2008 at 2:28 pm

    Yum. Another great way to get coffee truffles is to steep ground coffee in the cream. I jazz it up with a little bit of vanilla. Delicious!

  2. 2 adelphos24
    May 19, 2008 at 3:24 pm

    Absolutely. I personaly tend to strain out lumps or grit if doing things that way. Have you tried using tonka beans? Their a little hard to come by, but give a beautifully flavoured truffle.

  3. May 20, 2008 at 11:26 pm

    Tonka beans? I must know. Tell me more!

  4. 4 adelphos24
    May 31, 2008 at 3:20 pm

    They sort of look like a roasted coffee bean, and give a flavour similar to vanilla. I knew a Belgian master chocolatier who used to use them a lot. I have no idea where you’d find them, though. I think he brought them over from Europe.


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